Asthma and Vaccine Research

Asthma Vaccine 4 to 5 years away says Researchers

The vaccine developed in a model of healthy mice was then optimized in a mouse model of asthma. In this model the vaccine triggers production of specific antibodies and cellular responses specific to Derf1, thus guiding the immune system response to a non-allergenic, protective when the allergen is encountered. The two injections required and administered 3 weeks apart have significantly reduced the airway hyperresponsiveness and levels of inflammatory cytokines that were however present in the lungs of asthmatic mice unvaccinated.

Researchers have therefore designed a technique of DNA-based immunization of the allergenic substance. “Rather than administering allergen extracts repeatedly to reduce the sensitivity, we worked from specific DNA sequences (the allergen) responsible for the allergy. Some studies have shown the therapeutic potential of this strategy but we had to find techniques ensuring feasibility in humans, explains Bruno Pitard, Team Director for Innovative Biotherapy at Institute of the thorax (CNRS / INSERM / University of Nantes). The translation to humans does require treatment to be effective from a low dose of DNA injected.

The researchers first sought to prove the efficacy of this DNA-based immunization against the specific allergen, Derf1 in a relevant animal model developed by the team Bronchial Diseases Allergies and directed by Antoine Magnan. In Europe, Dermatophagoides farinae 1 (Derf1) is indeed a very common allergen carried by the mite Dermatophagoides farinae. More than half of patients allergic to dust mites produce specific IgE antibodies (Derf1) against this substance and disease characteristics

In practice, researchers have used the genetic sequences of interest encoding theallergen Derf1 associated with a nanovector consisting of a synthetic polymer. This DNA sequence, carried by a sort of “molecular taxi” in muscle cells, providing the protein synthesis of the allergen, has modulating the allergic response to dust mites in asthmatic animals (1).

These new results validate the potential of this new nanovector for DNA vaccination, and is under regulatory preclinical development for future clinical trials in humans.

These new results validate the potential of this new nanovector for DNA vaccination, and is under regulatory preclinical development for future clinical trials in humans.

describe an innovative vaccine against one of the most encountered allergens in asthmatic patients . Direct administration of the vaccine into the muscle of a mouse model of asthma significantly reduces the sensitivity to the allergen and the associated inflammatory response.

Researchers have therefore designed a technique of DNA-based immunization of the allergenic substance. “Rather than administering allergen extracts repeatedly to reduce the sensitivity, we worked from specific DNA sequences (the allergen) responsible for the allergy. Some studies have shown the therapeutic potential of this strategy but we had to find techniques ensuring feasibility in humans, explains Bruno Pitard, Team Director for Innovative Biotherapy at Institute of the thorax (CNRS / INSERM / University of Nantes). The translation to humans does require treatment to be effective from a low dose of DNA injected

An Effective Asthma Vaccine by Intramuscular Injection Shows Promise Says Researchers

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by breathing and an abnormal reactivity against allergens from the environment. Among the new directions currently in development, immunization is a promising approach says researchers. In a publication to appear in the journal Human Gene Therapy, researchers from Inserm and CNRS (“Institute of the thorax” CNRS / INSERM / University of Nantes) describe an innovative vaccine against one of the most encountered allergens in asthmatic patients . Direct administration of the vaccine into the muscle of a mouse model of asthma significantly reduces the sensitivity to the allergen and the associated inflammatory response.

Allergic asthma is a chronic respiratory disease affecting 300 million people worldwide. The number of individuals with asthma has doubled over the past decade and nearly 250,000 people die prematurely each year because of this affection. In most cases, asthma is caused by an abnormal reactivity to environmental substances known as allergens. From a physiological point of view, this hypersensitivity results in significant inflammation in the bronchi and bronchioles of individuals. Their ability to breathe properly is
then altered.

Current treatment involves the administration of corticosteroids to treat the symptoms and temporarily suspend the disease without curing it. An alternative treatment and perennial allergic asthma is based on a protocol-specific immunotherapy commonly called “desensitization.” Repeated administration of increasing doses of allergen is to reduce hypersensitivity and reduce symptoms during subsequent exposure. However, the effectiveness of this protocol is limited and highly variable among patients.

Researchers have therefore designed a technique of DNA-based immunization of the allergenic substance. “Rather than administering allergen extracts repeatedly to reduce the sensitivity, we worked from specific DNA sequences (the allergen) responsible for the allergy. Some studies have shown the therapeutic potential of this strategy but we had to find techniques ensuring feasibility in humans, explains Bruno Pitard, Team Director for Innovative Biotherapy at Institute of the thorax (CNRS / INSERM / University of Nantes). The translation to humans does require treatment to be effective from a low dose of DNA injected.

The researchers first sought to prove the efficacy of this DNA-based immunization against the specific allergen, Derf1 in a relevant animal model developed by the team Bronchial Diseases Allergies and directed by Antoine Magnan. In Europe, Dermatophagoides farinae 1 (Derf1) is indeed a very common allergen carried by the mite Dermatophagoides farinae. More than half of patients allergic to dust mites produce specific IgE antibodies (Derf1) against this substance and disease characteristics

In practice, researchers have used the genetic sequences of interest encoding theallergen Derf1 associated with a nanovector consisting of a synthetic polymer. This DNA sequence, carried by a sort of “molecular taxi” in muscle cells, providing the protein synthesis of the allergen, has modulating the allergic response to dust mites in asthmatic animals (1).

The vaccine developed in a model of healthy mice was then optimized in a mouse model of asthma. In this model the vaccinetriggers production of specific antibodies and cellular responses specific to Derf1, thus guiding the immune system response to a non-allergenic, protective when the allergen is encountered. The two injections required and administered 3 weeks apart have significantly reduced the airway hyperresponsiveness and levels of inflammatory cytokines that were however present in the lungs of asthmatic mice unvaccinated.

These new results validate the potential of this new nanovector for DNA vaccination, and is under regulatory preclinical development for future clinical trials in humans.

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