Determinants of longitudinal health-related quality of life change in children with asthma from low-income families: a report from the PROMIS(®) Pediatric Asthma Study.

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Determinants of longitudinal health-related quality of life change in children with asthma from low-income families: a report from the PROMIS(®) Pediatric Asthma Study.

Clin Exp Allergy. 2016 Sep 24;

Authors: Li Z, Leite W, Thompson L, Gross HE, Shenkman E, Reeve BB, DeWalt DA, Huang IC

Abstract
BACKGROUND: How the longitudinal asthma control status and other socio-demographic factors influence the changes of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among asthmatic children, especially from low-income families, has not been fully investigated.
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe the trajectories of asthma-specific HRQOL over 15 months, and examine the effect of asthma control status on HRQOL by taking socio-demographic factors into consideration.
METHODS: 229 dyads of asthmatic children and their parents enrolled in public insurance programs were recruited for assessing asthma control status and HRQOL over 4 time points of assessment. Asthma control status was measured using the Asthma Control and Communication Instrument and asthma-specific HRQOL was assessed using the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System’s Pediatric Asthma Impact Scale. Latent growth models (LGMs) were applied to examine the trajectory of HRQOL and the factors contributing to the changes of HRQOL.
RESULTS: Unconditional LGM revealed that HRQOL was improved over time. Conditional LGM suggested that accounting for asthma control and participants’ socio-demographic factors, the variation in the initial level of HRQOL was significant, yet the rate of change was not. Conditional LGM also revealed that poorly-controlled asthma status was associated with poor HRQOL at each time point (p’s<0.05). Lower parental education was associated with lower baseline HRQOL (p<0.05). Hispanic children had a larger increase in HRQOL over time (p<0.01) than non-Hispanic White children.
CONCLUSIONS: Vulnerable socio-demographic characteristics and poorly controlled asthma status affect HRQOL in children. This finding encourages interventions to improve asthma control status and HRQOL in minority children. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PMID: 27664979 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]

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